Category Archives: General Waist Training Information

On Self-Regulation, Limbic Brains, and Corset Waist Training

I’m one who is a life-long learner, even if a particular concept is familiar, but especially when it is not.

Recently I’ve begun studying “Limbic Resonance” (commonly associated with the right brain; see A General Theory of Love) and “Self-Regulation” (commonly associated with the left brain).

Both seem relevant to corset waist-training. How can that be, you ask?

It’s because (if you choose a coach or training buddy/teacher), you must choose the “right” one, one who is attuned to you and who can enter your world, understand your personal self-concept, goals, past struggles and approaches to figure shape and weight loss. This is best done face-to-face, but perhaps (jury is out) Skype can help, and email even less. Social media is worse because that is often a case of the blind leading the halt, neither experienced or educated sufficiently to purposely and compassionately guide you to become your better self when it comes to health and shape. I had to develop my Three-month waist training coaching program as an online program since people inquired from all over the world and US; my very first coaching student was PH, a chap from England.

Self regulation says Wikipedia, involves self observation, judgement, and self response.   Self observation (also known as introspection) is a process involving assessing one’s own thoughts and feelings in order to inform and motivate the individual to work towards goal setting and become influenced by behavioral changes. Judgement involves an individual comparing his or her performance to their personal or created standards. Lastly, self-response is applied, in which an individual may reward or punish his or herself for success or failure in meeting standard(s). An example of self-response would be rewarding oneself with an extra slice of pie for doing well on an exam.

It involves  impulse control and “the separation of our immediate impulses and long-term desires. We can plan, evaluate our actions, and refrain from doing things we will regret. Research shows that self-regulation is a strength necessary for emotional well-being. Violation of one’s deepest values results in feelings of guilt, which will undermine well-being. The illusion of control involves people overestimating their own ability to control events. Such as, when an event occurs an individual may feel greater a sense of control over the outcome that they demonstrably do not influence. This emphasizes the importance of perception of control over life events. 

Self regulation is relevant here because corset waist training typically revolves around adopting individualized strategies that increase the possibility of healthy, lifestyle change. Wikipedia says that “Self-regulation can be applied to many aspects of every day life, including social situations, personal health management, impulse control, and more. ” Sure, self regulation has its opponents, because control is really an illusory concept, right? We always tend to think we have more than we actually have; life intervenes and shit happens! But some self control is possible if we try.

Four components of self-regulation are described by Baumeister et al. (2007) and they are:

  • Standards: Of desirable behavior.
  • Motivation: To meet standards.
  • Monitoring: Of situations and thoughts that precede breaking standards.
  • Willpower: Internal strength to control urges

Waist training focuses on loss of inches and/or pounds. Self regulation provides one strategy for achieving control over food portions, food choices, how and when we eat, and our attitude toward food and it’s meaning in our lives. I suspect that achieving success in corset waist training has the potential of spill-over positive effects in your work and personal relationships. From recent brain research (see BrainHQ’s website especially if you would like to try out some brain games to improve various brain functions; I am immensely enjoying my foray into this new area for me!) I learned that for adults to change our brains and learn, we need motivation to change, actual results to help us continue in our motivation and efforts, and focus on what we want.

As I often say, three months of corset waist training can show results, even significant ones, but they won’t last if some habit change is not forthcoming during that adventure and time period; we will just revert back to all our former habits that brought us to the place where we question our own health or despair about our size and shape, and ability or lack thereof, to change either.

While limbic resonance starts in the right brain and is not an intellectual process, self-regulation is cognitive and requires focused effort. With the “right” coach for you, one who is empathetic, compassionate, responsive, and there for you during challenged days of waist training and all the way to the end of y our designated program, and with your own efforts at self-regulation, you will be certain to increase the chances that you will succeed in your reasonable waist-training goals!

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The “flexitarian” approach to eating

What we should eat is a common theme in books and news articles. It’s also part of my three-prong waist-training program with corsets. Just wearing a corset a certain number of hours a day at a certain tightness level, is not by itself, likely to create significant change in one’s waistline measurement or weight, especially after the dedicated period of training ends.

“More than almost any other diet, the Mediterranean diet is proven to yield positive health outcomes.” See: http://dailyburn.com/life/health/flexitarian-diet-less-meat-better-health/

Still, I like and prefer the idea of the ‘flexitarian’ approach to food–and no, I don’t like the term “diet” since it has such negative connotations in our society. Cutting down on meat, especially red meat, is pretty much decided to be beneficial to our long-term health. I don’t have any evidence that veganism or meat-eating contributes to our waist-training efforts, while portion control does relate to enhance our chance of success.

Likely the point raised in my book on waist training, still obtains:  it is more how we eat that contributes to our waist-training success, opposed to just concentrating on what we eat.

Eating breakfast, chewing food a loooong time, and eating up to 8 times a day but not much past 8 or 9 pm, is central to what seems to work for my students and for me to make corset waist training most comfortable and effective in a three-month dedicated program.

I ask students to chew each bite of every food 30 times before swallowing, for the first two weeks of training, in order to slow them down and allow food to process thru a squeezed midriff, but also to build up satiation before we stuff more food in, imagining that we are still hungry when we are not, if we just wait another 10 or so minutes.

When it comes to what to eat, that decision is highly individual. Coffee, alcohol and even vinegar-based salad dressings can be painful to some, but for example, when tight laced, I prefer eating salads lightly dressed with lemon and olive oil and have no trouble whatsoever. Others can eat meat at every meal and have no trouble.

The single food I have concluded should be minimized if not cut out entirely during training as well as during our non-training lives, is  added refined sugar. There is entirely too much scientific data to ignore, even studies that only draw associations to, if not causes of, alzheimer’s, diabetes, and other health risks.

I encourage my students to cut way back on added sugars and opt instead for alternatives like eating more fresh or dried fruit and using honey or dates when cooking instead of white sugar. Sugar is sugar, yes! But a little bit of the natural kinds of sugar to me, makes a lot of sense!

 

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Redux: Habits

I found some helpful pages in a somewhat outdated 1990 book on posture,  Understanding Balance by T.D.M. Roberts. The outdating regards his theories of posture, but his information on habit seemed accurate today, and clarified a few things for me.

He defines “habit” as patterns of learned behavior that after many repetitions, come to be performed without detailed attention. once it is formed it may prove difficult to change, because in part, we may be unaware of it. We become aware when the “sensory consequences of that action come to our attention.”

Many years ago I used to unconsciously bite the inside of my lip. I knew it was dangerous and not attractive and wanted to change it. However I could not, until I used a technique that might work to change other habits you don’t like. A psychiatrist that I consulted by phone, suggested that I keep a journal. This journal forced me to become aware of the “sensory consequences” of what I was doing. Every time I found myself biting my lip, I had to write down the time of day, where I was, what I was doing, and on a scale of 1 to 10, how stressed out I felt. I had to “feel” what I was doing in the moment.

In three days I cured myself and never bit the inside of my lip again (unless the occasional chewing too fast!). True story; I cured myself with info provided in one short phone call to set up an in-person appointment!

Roberts also says to change a habit requires at least two things: (1) an adequate desire to change, and (2) an awareness of the “feel” of a changing condition which will lead to a new habit.

Eating too rapidly easily leads to eating too much, a habit that is anathema to comfort when one is seriously waist training for some months, and lacing down slowly for many more hours as the weeks go by. Continue with this generally bad habit during waist training, and you will soon enough have “adequate desire to change!” (Also, you should lace down then eat, not the reverse!)

To develop an awareness of the “feel” of a changing condition leading to a sound new habit, I recommend for the first two weeks in order to become aware of this old bad habit, and to kick-start a new habit, you chew each bite of food 30 times before you swallow. Yes, even ice cream. I’m quite serious about this and require this of my three-month waist-training coaching students. It is also quite humorous, depending on what the food is that you are putting into your mouth.

While eating is a behavior that doesn’t require supervision, it does require skilled control in order to be comfortable while waist training — or even if you are not but wish to lose some inches or weight by reducing portion size (try a simple change by eating on small plates at all times!) and easing your digestion (prepping the food before you swallow), and stopping when you feel full because you now take the time to recognize the signals, rather than overeating by bolting down food.

It’s all pretty much common sense, right? Start small when you want to re-set your bad habit, don’t start big and “bite” off more than you can chew (could not resist that one). Concentrate only on chewing 30 times before you swallow and soon enough you will be ready to start on other beneficial eating and nutrition habits!

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Not so difficult to understand after all: habit and motivation re-visited

Toni before and after corsetingI’ve long been fascinated with the power of habit and motivation especially when it comes to corset waist training. That includes my fascination with who makes it work to reach their figure-shaping goals, and who does not.

Today’s morning news show on ABC-TV featured a visit by author James Clear and discussion of his new New York Time‘s Best Seller Atomic Habit. Clear boiled down his theories and confirmed a few to which I have always subscribed. It all seems so simple, even if what moves us to implement those theories remains so mysterious. Here they are:

1. Get clear about your goals, don’t worry about “motivation.”

I have students set numerical goals before they start, in inch reductions and weight reduction desired (they are two separate things and you don’t have to do both!), and how tightly they want to wear their corset for how many hours to improve their record by the end of training.

2. Start small, maybe very small.

There are only three elements to effective waist training:  a regular schedule or corset wear six days a week, waist-targeted exercise (not aerobic or weight training or Crunch or any specific general program and not even at a gym), and corset-friendly eating and nutrition habits (note that I do not use the word “diet” since that is not a relevant concept today no matter if you are waist training or not in an attempt to lose inches or weight).

3. Never miss twice; re-start fast, like the next day.

I advise setting only a 95% personal goal of completion of the program elements; it is impossible to hold ourselves accountable for 100% completion. That is doomed to failure from the start. Give yourself a bit of leeway to be human, to encounter daily crises that take all your time and attention, not to mention energy. However, the next day add a few more minutes to the 20 mins of waist-targeted exercises the first month (then 30 min. the second and 40 min. the third), or wear the corset two hours more than on your plan the next two days, and that sort of thing. Push yourself a wee bit to make time up, but don’t punish yourself and just quit because you have fallen off the waist-training wagon!

4. Lock in a “commitment device” such as a buddy who will show up at 6 am for that morning run and you’ll be embarrassed if you let her down (social accountability).

I’m keen on the idea of a Waist Training Buddy, not necessarily someone who trains with you, but that can work, too. Choose someone who can provide a delicious and effective form of competition that can work well to motivate you. I adore Pandora, a well-known ex-pat American living in Britain, who has about the same figure measurements and weight as I do. She was corsetier Michael Garrod’s favorite model (he passed in 2003) and I got to know her at various corset events and appearances at ROMANTASY boutique from 1990 to 1998 when it closed. We loved to tight lace and go hours testing our resolve at various corset events, but I’ll never forget her sense of humor at the end when occasionally she would say, “Ok Ann, now we’re ready. Let’s remove our corsets and go get a pizza!”

Clear also answered a typical question of “how long will it take to lock in a new habit?” His answer? “Forever.”

His point is one I make when students ask me, “Will corset waist training results last?” I tend to answer, “No, if you go out the next day and start pigging out on Krispy Kreme donuts!” You know what I mean.

The only thing with which I disagree, is the author’s advice to forget goals and concentrate on getting into place a system that works. I agree with that, but I think a system should be proceeded with a goal, one that is (1) reasonable, (2) do-able, (3) consistent with your lifestyle so that you are likely to pursue it, and (4) slightly under what is probable to accomplish and one that you probably will pursue to the end of your period of training.

I tell my students that I would rather them set a goal slightly under what they think they want and can accomplish, so that they will more than likely reach it, and be inspired.

Sideview 2009 Waist-training Student, Cat, after 9 weeks of training

Inspired to do what? Keep going for one thing. No one says you have to corset waist train for three months, or three weeks. You can set multiple increments of waist training, one right after the other, or one every year for a re-set and weight/measurement check, or one periodically over many years on occasions when you find yourself slipping back into bad eating habits such as portion overloading or stress and mindless eating.

Inspired to do what? Celebrate! Women tend to resonate to that point more than men. Men seem to go directly for their goal then move on without taking a moment to savor victory, or during the training process to seek out others to appreciate progress and let the trainee show off. More’s the pity.

Having a “rah rah” section as Marie, an awesome tight-lacer once told me, is a necessary component of successful waist training, at least for her. Having someone appreciate and celebrate your effort as well as your successes along the way, can inspire you to continue to take better care of yourself after training ends.

It’s all pretty simple. Now what will start you moving forward in your New Year’s Resolutions that about 80% of us break by the end of January every year?

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Choosing the right corset waist training–or health-improvement–technique and teacher

A principle applicable to any goal of changing a habit, size, or shape (including one’s waist measurement or weight), is that of “finding the right teacher at the right time.” I’ve concluded that no matter how efficacious a particular approach, therapy, “hack,” or training regime is, one won’t get the most out of it unless one trusts and respects one’s teacher or trainer. Also, one has to research and choose the best approach that works on an individual basis.

When moving into the more esoteric mind-body therapies and approaches, including corset waist training, the above principles are particularly applicable, because much success or failure in applying the method can be credited to a compatible teacher and method usually based on simple belief coupled with reliance on anecdotal evidence, not randomized controlled trials–the diamond standard for research methodologies. Yet some of these therapies do have RCTs and they are worth pursuing. (However, I don’t yet know of a research grant of say, $150,000, to study what actually happens to the ribs and organs in waist training before and after, with all the variables sliced and diced to a true standard of comparability of subjects. In my lifetime it just won’t happen when it comes to corsets.)

Which doesn’t mean that one should not pursue the more esoteric of therapies and approaches, those with only anecdotal evidence of effectiveness. With a proper mindset, an attitude of flexibility and hope, common sense, an evident rationality behind the theory, and a moderate method, plus the right teacher found at the right time, corset waist training can work for many, and remain permanent–if and only if one does not end the program and then start pigging out (again?) on Krispy Kremes!

I’ve been a fan of the Alexander Technique for several years now, and understand a lot more about how it works after my many classes and more reading in the field. Recently I asked my teacher, Elyse Sharfarman (bodyproject.us) to summarize the differences between that technique to relieve stress and calm the body and mind, with Feldenkrais, another alternative mind-body therapy. A chronic pain program director at Kaiser recently suggested to me that because Feldenkrais was offered in her program to Kaiser members, and because the goals were the same as for the Alexander Technique (light, efficient movement), that was a sufficient option for patients.

The implication at least to me, was that the two therapies or techniques were interchangeable. With Elyse’s crystal-clear explanation of the differences set forth in this blog below, I remain convinced that they are substantially different in method, and that anyone interested in pursuing alternative therapies for better health and stress reduction (including stress eating and portion overload that contribute to a plump figure and certain health risks), should check out both the Alexander Technique and Feldenkrais, and then find a compatible, qualified teacher of the technique chosen–or try both!

Personally, I found the right teacher in Elyse, who has 10 yrs. of teaching experience at the San Francisco American Conservatory Theater plus many more years of study with a well respected teacher Frank Ottiwell, and proper certifications in the technique. Plus she has none of the “attitude” demonstrated by some teachers of the more esoteric mind-body therapies; for Elyse it is not form over substance. Plus she focuses her work on her individual patient’s needs and progress, pulling from her ballroom and modern dance experience/classes, and master’s degree studies in Physiological Psychology.

In her classes  I first learned the unique concept of delaying movement (called “inhibition” by F.M. Alexander) so that I noticed what I was doing to habitually over-use and stress muscles (sometimes with improper posture). If I did not first stop and notice what I was doing, then I could not choose to change and saw no reason to do so–a simple but profound lesson! I also learned the concept of self-direction that I easily employ while going about my daily business. Specific mental reminders help me notice and release unnecessary muscle use and strain as I move (walk, stand, sit, read, watch tv, work on the computer, paint picture, etc.), strain that can easily creep back into my body; no specific exercise is required of me.

More importantly, I once and for all learned how it feels in my entire body (brain down to toes) to totally relax every single muscle and finally feel safe and pain free, through “constructive rest” in a supine position. I can only describe this new feeling when supine as being completely flat like a pancake, or being at complete “oneness” during table work with Elyse, and later when I practice at home. By now I can easily duplicate the feeling/thoughts either lying down or standing up and when I want, in order to stop in its tracks any impending muscle tension and stress. The Alexander Technique has become my “biofeedback with a brain” program, and has had the amazing result of improving some of my interpersonal relationship skills as well. I am less likely to jump to conclusions or be critical of others these days, and that is a good thing!

In sum, I believe that this technique provided the final key I was missing to restore me fully to my former sense of well-being, ability, and delight in being alive, after a disabling back/neck spasm triggered in the summer of 2016. Physical therapy exercises given to me by Kaiser’s PT (and followed faithfully each day to a “T” for over a year), plus three-days-a-week-swimming and another three days of walking and back/neck exercises that I continue to this day–useful as they both are and continue to be–were simply not enough to finally cure me of pain.

Of relevance to the Alexander Technique is that there now exist an increasing number of significant, randomized control trials (not just anecdotal evidence) of the effectiveness of the technique on various health matters including chronic back pain; see, e.g., published research on the technique: https://www.amsatonline.org/aws/AMSAT/pt/sp/research and the best study to date: https://www.bmj.com/content/337/bmj.a884.

Here is what Elyse said:

*“Feldenkrais studied briefly with F. M. Alexander, then developed his own method which is also influenced by Judo and physics. The method does not address the habitual way that people move in their everyday life, nor does it teach them how to change this. The assumption (of Feldenkrais) is that by doing exercises (which can be profound), you will move differently automatically. I don’t know if this is true, given that all the triggers for poor movement (stress, bad chairs, hurrying) persist even if you are temporarily moving better as a result of a Feldenkrais lesson. The Alexander Technique teaches you how to change your response to all those triggers for poor movement and pain. Through the Alexander Technique you learn how to use your mind (thinking) to change habits of movement while sitting, standing, driving, walking, etc. In this way, Alexander Technique is much more practical because you don’t need to lie down and do an exercise to practice it. You can improve movement in your daily life by simply thinking, no matter how emotionally stressful your day is, or even with initially poorly-designed posture or movements.

“In sum, Feldenkrais uses movement to change movement. Alexander Technique uses conscious awareness and thinking to change movement. Feldenkrais is about changing habits through learning new movement pathways. Alexander Technique is about changing habits by (1) becoming aware of them, (2) stopping inefficient habits, and (3) thinking about how to organize the body more efficiently.”
–Elyse Shafarman, MA, AmSAT Certified Alexander Technique Teacher

As one certified Alexander Technique teacher once told me when I was deciding what to pursue, the technique is “a thinking person’s PT.” Now I know it to be true!

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Taking your power back in waist training

It’s almost beyond debate that there is a link between emotions and ill health, particularly in chronic back pain, IBS, arthritis, and other. If you want proof, check out the Dec. 7, 2004 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Professor Elissa S. Epel, UCSF Medical Center, and some colleagues, published an article affirming that the mind plays a significant role in our physical health. They demonstrated a definitive connection between perceived and chronic stress and changes in telomeres. Telomeres are specific areas of the chromosome that are known to relate to the length of cell life and aging. I attended a mini-med school class at UCSF not long ago and heard her speak on these results with respect to our national epidemic of obesity. Minimizing stress is one specific strategy that could be ameliorative.

But there are challenges in our society to overcome before that concept will be universally accepted. Sadly enough, initially men may have the most difficult time with it.

I heard today that an NFL football player recently and vehemently rejected the notion that he had shed a tear or two on the field after sustaining a serious injury. I feel sorry for him, not only for the injury, one that I would never wish on anyone, even one who accepts the substantial risk to present and future health of playing football. I feel more sorry for him because he is still victim to the  long existing and misguided social message that men must not be weak nor show weakness — and that tears are still considered as a prime sign of male, and perhaps even female, weakness.

Learning earlier this year about Dr. John Sarno and reading his seminal book, The Divided Mind, I often think about the connection between emotions and brain-caused pain. Any ache or pain I experience causes me to first ask: is there a structural cause or not? And even if there may be a structural cause, why am I continuing to experience pain? Could that pain be brain-caused?

Doctors well know that even many structural problems such as arthritis or disc ruptures, do not cause pain in many of their patients. It’s an undeniable fact if you read Dr. Sarno’s remarkable book, and that fact may change your life.

A second step I take when encountering pain or a health problem, is to take charge and get more information. Usually I do that by binging the topic, and/or by making a doctor’s appointment. What happens time and again when I do either or both of those things, is that I immediately improve!

Recently the same thing happened. I am dealing with two pesky problems the past two months, one of them being that often I wake up at 3 am in the morning. My mind starts working overtime, and I have to get up and stay up until about 10 or 12 in the morning when I collapse into bed to catch up on disrupted sleep. After struggling for about two months with this problem, I recently made an appointment to chat with my doctor about it. The next five nights, I slept all the night through! (Incidentally you can try what seems to help for me: one hour before turn-out-the-lights-time, take one melatonin and one or two droppers of passion flower extract)

It didn’t take me long to realize that I improved because I took one or more action steps to take back my power over my problem. I decided not to sit there suffer. Even though I was waiting a few days for a telephone call with my doctor, I had acted to do something, and the very act of acting, translated into improvement.

In my book on waist training I relate a personal story about a time in my mid 20s when I used to bite or chew the inside of my lip when I was under stress, which was a lot of the time. I knew it to be a dangerous practice and one I had to stop. I called a local hypnotherapist psychiatrist, chatted with him about my problem, and made an appointment in one week to see him. He gave me a homework assignment in the meantime. I was to write down every time I caught myself chewing on my lip, the date, time, circumstances, and my stress level on a scale from 1 to 10. I started the record and three days later I stopped the habit. I called the doctor and cancelled my appointment, explaining what had happened. He and I both laughed! And, never again was I plagued with this destructive habit.

The point of this blog is to suggest that if you are dissatisfied with your size, shape, or health when it comes to nutrition and well being, and if you but commit to corset waist train in some way and take one action step, you might find that automatically you start feeling better and doing the right things!

That one action step could be:

–reading my Corset Waist Training book,

–calling me to register for my coaching program (but don’t start until January since I don’t recommend you make a serious waist-training effort that encompasses food-tempting holidays such as Thanksgiving or Christmas),

— enrolling in a social media group that supports waist training with reliable, fact-based information and encouragement.

— reading Lucy William’s great book, Solaced, with stories about the successes of many other folks who love and wear or tried corsets for many beneficial health-related purposes, or

— binging “corset waist training” and reading online resources.

Sure, we have to evaluate possible action steps carefully, being sure before we choose one or more of them, to consult reliable, fact-based resources; we can’t abandon all sense and look for a guru or “social media influencer” to follow mindlessly when it comes to our health. We have to stay in our “adult” and take care of ourselves to the end.

But when we encounter health challenges, act we must–and accept we must that many of our health issues are emotion-based and brain-caused, not structurally-caused or other-caused. We cause many of them, especially ones that bother us and cause us pain, as well as health problems that last a long time or recur periodically without structural causation.

We need to be responsible for the many choices available to us throughout life in order to live the happiest, most satisfying life we can, while we are on this earth.

I’m down for that; are you?

 

 

 

 

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Our styles of eating tip us off to our success or struggles in waist training

My photographer friend Jeanette just sent me this article, a good summary of the main “styles” of eating, or relationships to food:

https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/04/health/parenting-food-drayer/index.html

Regarding my waist-training program coaching students, I’ve found the styles mentioned, ring true.

One early student, my third, told me that she had little food when she grew up in a poor family and afterwards had a struggle with her weight because it was “feast or famine.” When she grew up, had a nice job, and could afford to shop and eat well, she did–but overeat she did, too. We had to work hard on portion control and rearranging her thinking to an adult nurturing level as she practiced a new diet and corseting to drop some pounds. The simple (but not only) step of changing her plate size to a smaller one, helped her reach her goals.

Another potential student told me she grew up being permitted to eat a lot of junk food–and in the past, she did and accordingly, ballooned up in weight and size. She found it quite easy to fall back on old habits and put on a lot of weight very quickly, even after she had been ‘eating clean’ for a good long time (see great picture of a very healthy dinner). Sadly enough just before commencing her program, she elected not to continue, so I don’t know how she fared after that.

And then there is the “caring parent” or nurturing culture, that uses food to express love, and like my Southern mom, pushed sweets and caloric snacks on guests…and either pushed or permitted way too many sweets on us children, too!

I used to serve dessert after every meal, a pattern I had adopted from my family style of eating. Once I decided 3.5 years ago to give up almost all added white sugar, I cleaned my fridge and quit buying ice cream and other sweets. Just the other day I made the most delicious banana bread using no white sugar, two bananas, almond and wheat flour, and dates. Really delicious now that I have cleaned out my palate from expecting sugary sweets.

Our corseting house guest just left, and the last night I cut in two pieces (2/3 and 1/3) a famous San Francisco treat called “It’s It.”  If you ever are here, try one! It’s basically a yummie chocolate iced ice cream sandwich in choice of three flavors. My partner commented after eating his 2/3 piece, wow, this tastes almost sickeningly sweet — I need to get a glass of water as the sugar is almost burning my mouth.

To change any unhelpful style or habit of eating and food choice, we have to give ourselves sufficient time for tastes to change, and keep an experimental attitude to try and keep trying a variety of veggies and fruits as we decrease fats and protein–a corset friendly diet as I call it, for serious waist training. Mind you I’m not for this or that diet fad! But restricting the stomach while corseting with a waistline inch or weight loss goal, mandates a more sensible approach that includes reducing sweets, acids, and fats.

Be sure you analyze your own “style” of eating and ask what attitudes you have developed regarding food, that persist from your childhood. Knowledge of how we got to where we feel we need to change, will help us make the right choices for a healthy future!

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