Distraction and Diversion – Pros and Cons in Waist Training

The news today on ABC-TV’s  “Good Morning America” (I admit to watching this fluffy, popular, and pop news channel in the mornings with my scrambled egg, half a piece of bacon, and Pixie espresso) was amazing– an absolute bombardment of miscellany that somehow relates to corset waist training via today’s topic of distraction and diversion. It included but was not limited to:

  • The first boy doll ‘Logan’, was released by “American Doll”–(and it’s only 2017, just about 60 yrs. since the advent of the Women’s Liberation movement, of which I, and many good men of course, was a proud early member.) Parents and children of both genders are apparently pleased.
  • 88% of people age 19 to 24 admit to driving while texting, or running a red light.
  • Flynn was fired from Trump’s cabinet for lying to Trump (not to mention to the public) about discussing with the Russian ambassador, and diminishing the potential effect after Jan. 20, of  Obama’s earlier sanctions against Russia for hacking our election process.
  • Other Trump staff are now reported to have been in contact with Russia long before the transition period, during the election run-up (is anyone, D or R, truly surprised?)
  • Spicer in his news conference re: Flynn, said (in relevant part), “there’s no information that would conclude me that anyone was in contact with Russia before the transition period”.  Anyone notice the wrong words that news reporters are more commonly using than in the past? Is the teaching of correct grammar and the English language now defunct in US schools?
  • “Eat less, move more” is once again in the news, with a “new study” showing that belly fat and the apple shape are associated with increased risk of high cholesterol, diabetes and more. Too simplistic, right? And ubiquitous public health information of the sort proposing this solution to obesity doesn’t seem to be helping.

There are multiple reasons that I eschew pop news for weeks on end and from time to time, refusing to watch anything but PBS’s evening news program and the Financial News, plus CSPAN when a meaty program on the US or world affairs is being presented. Of course I love my Sunday New York Times, where I often find substantial articles on health and nutrition, topics directly relevant to my professional focus on corset waist training.

Slide Open MouthNews is dismally appalling and negative these days. I have a good friend who won’t watch the TV or read hardcopy news at all, except for an occasional peek at Facebook news. Pop or entertainment news is pitifully brief and all over the place, like the above. It routinely upsets me. It leads me down multiple paths of diversion and distraction. These days I fire off letters to my Senators or the White House to avoid doing nothing but fuming. Some claim that pop news or any news or programs lead me to eat more (and usually forget my manners) when I dine in front of the TV and not at my table.

Of course, I imagine pop news leads me to be sort of “up to date” when I’m not an avid fan of social media but only an occasional user. I like my privacy and prefer my friends face-to-face and where I can delve more into meaningful, detailed  conversations such as on personal email compared to 140-character tweets.

I learned recently about a beneficial effect of diversion and distraction.

Dr. Patrick Wall, the author of highly-recommended Pain: The Science of Suffering, taught me that distraction can be a powerful pain-killer. We have to focus on pain in order to feel it. We have to pay attention to injury, to be in pain. If we are distracted, we don’t feel pain until later if at all. Witness the rush of adrenaline when we are injured or in danger, allowing us to rescue or take care of others before we turn to focus on our own discomfort or tragedy.

I also learned from Painful Yarns by Lorimer Moseley, also highly recommended (watch his hilarious TED talk on YouTube) that  all pain is not tissue-derived. Some or a lot of it comes from our brains firing off neurons designed to warm of “pain” in order to protect us, but that felt pain while real, is also “not real” or  exaggerated. Just learning that fact helped me enormously on my daily walks to rehab a recent back spasm (another one!). When I occasionally trip or step off a curb a bit hard onto the street, I don’t now overreact and imagine that it is painful. I remain more objective, continue on and think about the situation. Did the trip really cause me tissue-oriented pain? I never has so far. The concept has proved beneficial for my recovery.

My present waist training coaching program student, Ms. K (pictured at the start of her program on Feb 7, left) is having a bit of a hard time  moving up in hours of corset wear a day, in the moderate training program she is following. We design a student’s program to gradually increase the no. of hours of wear from two for three days, to four for three days, to six for three days (or a img_0370similar increase, depending on several factors). A slow increase such as in this example, enhances comfort and tolerance of a new, stiff feeling of a structured garment such as the corset.

When she reached four continuous hours of wear at the latter part of her first week, my student mentioned that she wore her corset two hours, then lay down for two more hours to meet her program goals that day. But once she lay down, she stared at the clock and found that time went by very slowly. I believe she increased the difficulty of waist training by paying attention to time. It is when we ignore time (except to double check to ensure we don’t over-do our set program wearing hours), that time goes by very quickly.

I write about distraction as a technique for making waist training easier, in my new book, Corset Waist Training: a primer on easy, fun and fashionable waistline reduction.

When you build up to long hours of corset wear at tighter levels of restriction, you will surely hit the wall some day and want out of your corset. The key is not to move into pain or excruciating pain, but to be able to tolerate discomfort even to the edge of pain, so that you derive maximum benefit from the corset in your search to trim your figure and/or weight. Try the technique of distraction.

Take a walk, play with your pet, call a friend, send an email, read a chapter in your book, wash dishes–almost anything will do, and then go back to normal activities.

Also if you begin to experience discomfort into pain when corseting, remember Moseley’s point. Could it be that unfamiliar feelings of tight restriction, impediment to movement and breathing, folding of the skin and so on from lacing down, strike you as uncomfortable rather than just something neutral to observe and keep an eye on? Are you overreacting to a “not normal” feeling that your brain perceives as endangering your body and health?

I’ve never seen the above discussed  in any forum on corset waist training nor mentioned in any book on the topic. I’ll be thinking more about it to see if there are examples from my own corseting experience and that of my students, that can further enlighten me. Always happy to hear your thoughts!

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Filed under General, General Waist Training Information, Hot Topics on Health

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