Others can Support your Waist-training Journey; and the importance of those last pesky pounds!

I love optimistic news items!

I’m proud to be ‘a Pollyanna’ as my therapist BFF called me one time! How about you? If you don’t expect the best, then surely you will achieve and/or encounter the worst. That applies to everything in life, as far as I can tell. It clearly applies to corset waist training.

That’s why I love this July 24 Natchez Democrat news story about success in weight loss and health improvement, but this time, weight loss and better health without a corset in sight.

A church pastor weighing 308 lbs., decided to do something about his diabetes and weight—and he did it in a few short months, losing 70 lbs. He attributes his progress to many things, tho he now wants to drop 40 more pounds.

Of course–we wrote to tell him about how a man’s stays and our corset waist-training program and book Corset Magic, could help him shed those last pesky pounds–the pounds that are often the very hardest to drop. That’s one key place in a slow, deliberate overall weight-loss journey where corsets come in handy and can be quite effective. They can help with an extra “push” and extra motivation and fun, to deal with the final few pounds and reach your  goals.

FCM - Tim beltedIt worked just that way for Tim.  Tim was our third-ever coaching program student who enrolled in 2003. He when down from 210 to about 190 lbs by himself over 7 months, then in two more months lost a few more lbs. while waiting for his man’s stays (a custom man’s corset by our then-corsetiere BR Creations) to be constructed and delivered. You’ll see Tim pictured before and after a one year shape-up journey, in the seventh row right on this page and pictured in this blog.

The final three months of his year of weight loss, after Tim entered our program, he dropped another 4.5″ off his waistline and 17 final pounds to end up weighing 166 lbs!

Sure enough, Tim has struggled a bit over the last 12 years to keep control of his weight–but at every juncture he has re-employed some of the strategies and techniques we taught him, and re-dedicated himself to health, first. Continued contact with us and with his former Training Buddy, has helped him recalibrate to drop some weight over the years.

It’s instructive to read the above news story about the pastor, to glean what motivated and worked for him. His experience struck me as quite relevant to corset waist training:

“It’s really up to the individual, I have learned,” Green said. “You have to find your motivation. Having my wife (Suzanne) and my daughters (Victoria and Jessi) be so proud of me, that has really motivated me. I know that I can do this.”

The free program the pastor followed incorporates many of the key concepts in our coaching program, necessitating some, but not onerous, changes, and a “lifestyle” approach, rather than just a “one item diet” or “one perfect solution.”

Key for him, and for anyone who wishes to try corset waist training, is the support of others.

Bret, one of my esteemed friends and early coaching program student (2009), also pictured on the above ROMANTASY webpage, before and after his efforts to drop body fat content, feels as I do: organizing a consistent support system around you will almost guarantee your success (if you also set reasonable goals and are flexible in your definition of “success”; see prior blog about those two matters).

My new “how to” Primer book on the waist training process (due out for Kindle in late fall this year, or early spring), stresses the above point. Not only students whom I’ve interviewed, but their official and unofficial Training Buddies and supportive friends, confirm the importance of a “rah rah” section, to keep you moving forward. Here are some points from the book-in-progress (you may preorder now on the above webpage):

I don’t know very many people who have lost substantial weight while corseting, without having regular support and information provided by an experienced friend, spouse, partner, or coach. You may not need a lot of encouragement, but tight-lacer Marie Lourdes says, “Everyone needs a rah-rah section. Getting sidetracked is too easy in these uncertain times.”
A coach or buddy is not a radical suggestion. From the diet world, we continually hear this recommendation. The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior researched how a dieter’s significant other influenced success or failure (San Francisco Examiner, June 10, 2008). If the partner was helpful, even changing their own eating habits to lose weight, the dieter was successful. You’ve read earlier how Shane helped his wife in a similar way when she was a student. [He was a chef and changed the way he prepared their meals to low-fat, low-sugar, high-flavor.] Lynn found that “frequent email communication with Coach Ann was key to keeping me motivated and focused.”
You’ll likely need cheerleaders because waist training is demanding, much like competing in the Iron Man or Iron Woman challenge. You can “hit the wall” like a long-distance runner does, then benefit from an extra push along the way. Reaching your goal can be just as exhilarating to you, not to mention to your appreciative audience, as winning a gold medal at the Olympics to the cheers of your friends. In addition, it’s just plain fun to share your successes as you move forward.
Some days your body will rebel and not want to accept the corset. Perhaps you’re hung over after a night of indulgence. Maybe a lady has the PMS blues and typical bloating. Sometimes a cold or the flu has kept you in bed for days, or your boss yelled at you and you want to flee both the psychological and physical demands that tie you down. Maybe you haven’t been “regular” for a few days and your innards just won’t be squeezed until the problem is solved.
If you’re like many people and you try to waist train in private, you may get discouraged if no one appreciates your struggle and the results. Having someone to guide and support you—whom you can question, report to, show off in front of, and involve in lacing you into the corset or assisting with its removal—can encourage perseverance and help you feel less alone.
You might get confused over some physical reaction you have. You might feel lonely and perhaps silly to be pursuing something so unusual. You might even find it boring. Or you may just want to ask your coach a question—or complain about your coach to a friend!

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Have you used a support system in your journey to waist train? We’d love to hear about it!

 

 

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Filed under General Waist Training Information, Men's Stays and Training

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